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Sunday, February 2, 2014

Support Regina Holliday, FACMImimi on Gittip

ACMImimi Fellow Regina Holliday's blog post today talks about her setting up a virtual "tip jar" on Gittip (www.gittip.com). I read through all of the materials on Gittip -- how their company works and what they are doing -- and think it represents another exciting direction in new economy thinking.

I signed up to give Regina $0.73 per week on Gittip and ask that all of you think about doing the same. That's only $39.96 a year when you throw in the bank fees that Gittip charges ($2 over the course of the year). If your life has been changed for the better by Regina's work and mission like mine has, please sign up to give Regina a weekly boost in her income. Show you mean it by giving something with $0.73 at the end. If everyone with a Walking Gallery jacket tips Regina $0.73 a week, she will receive over $11,000 a year to supplement her income from speaking/painting/Regina-being. It's not enough to live on and raise two boys, but it's something. Let's support Regina!

For what it's worth, I've designated ACMImimi as my own cause on Gittip. I have never received any personal income from the videos and music I've made for the cause of bringing health information to people through music and have invested hundreds of hours and many dollars over the years to bring these works to you. If you have a burning desire to support these efforts, consider doing so through Gittip. It will let me know that people value this contribution to the field and will motivate me to invest more time into making them and creating new, more ambitious works. You'll find me on Gittip at https://www.gittip.com/rossmartin.

Wednesday, January 8, 2014

We Picked a Fine Time to Leave El Nopalito

Tonight we say goodnight to an amazing establishment in Silver Spring, El Nopalito Grill -- home to the Wednesday night Songwriters Association of Washington open mic night for more than 100 shows. 

I had to say goodbye the way that a singer/songwriter does - with a new song for the occasion (with apologies to Luceille and her author). It's been a busy time in the world of medical imformatimusicology and informatics too, so I haven't been going very often over the last few months and I've felt it. It's therapy for me -- some people go bowling, some do yoga -- I play open mics. I listen too. And tonight was a great evening of music from across the spectrum. We had over 20 performers, so it was just two songs or 10 minutes. And it was great, just great. 

El Nopalito lost its lease or something like that, so next week we will be starting at a new venue. But tonight we celebrate El Nopalito and their amazing staff and chefs. You will be missed. Here is a song dedicated to them and to the fine songwriters I've had the privilege of hearing and playing for. 


We Picked a Fine Time to Leave El Nopalito

 

At a Tennessee truck stop about three a.m.

I was feelin’ real down and alone

When in walked a lady who looked so familiar

Just like a young woman I’d known

I said, “Howdy-do” and she sang, “Same t’you

Her melody turned on a light

I said, “Years ago, did you go out to El Nopalito

For that open mic on Wednesday nights?”

 

I asked her to sit and I gave her a hit

From my bottle of Jack Daniel’s Black

We talked of a time that was many years gone

The memories sure took us back

Back to the stage and a fine bygone age

When songs were performed by our gang

We toasted that crew and the tunes that they knew

And these are the words that we sang

 

CHORUS:

We picked a fine time to leave El Nopalito

I sure loved their chiles and combo burritos

We heard some good songs

And we heard some bad songs

Then we sang, “Adios, muy amigos”

We picked a fine time to leave El Nopalito

 

Reminicin’ ’til dawn over coffee and yawns

We sang songs until we went hoarse

We swapped juicy stories of yesteryear glories

Who hooked up and who got divorced

We recounted past scenes like when George and Arlene

Used to belt rockabilly full blast

Those nights were the peak of the workaday week

I guess it was too good to last

 

REPEAT CHORUS

 

Dell sold the shop and he took to bar hoppin

Tradin’ a song for a beer

Chris went on a mission to blend drums and fishin

Larry’s been missin for years

Buck Stone and Murray made it big in a hurry

Jeff’s now a YouTube phenom

And Scott and his honey run a posh nudist col’ny

For senile hippies on Guam

 

REPEAT CHORUS


Our heads were both hurtin’ and we both knew for certain

It was high time to call it a wrap

My spirit revived, I felt strangely alive

But more likely I’d go home to nap

I gave her a hug and I felt that old tug

To go find me some new open mics

Sure, it’ll be great, but it won’t compensate

For the magic we shared Wednesday nights

 

REPEAT CHORUS

 

For El Nopalito Grill on the occasion of their last open mic, January 8th, 2014

Thanks for taking such good care of us!

Ross D. Martin, MD, MHA

© 2014 ACMImimi

Wednesday, January 1, 2014

ACMImimi Announces New Fellows and Members

The Admissions Committee of The American College of Medical Informatimusicology is pleased to announce the Winter 2014 ACMImimi Fellow inductees. Five new Fellows have been named. In addition, The College welcomes four new ACMImimi Members.  In contrast to Fellows, Members of ACMImimi do not have to demonstrate eminence in the art and science of Medical Informatimusicology to join, but simply need to declare an interest Medical Informatimusicology and agree to abide by the ACMImimi pledge. Congratulations to these new Fellows and Members, deserving all. 

Those wishing to be considered for admission into The College as Fellows should submit an application to the Admissions Committee, which will review each application carefully and make a determination of worthiness based upon merit. The College now boasts 94 Fellows.  Who will be number 100?

New ACMImimi Fellows (January 1st, 2014)

  • Voice minor at North Texas State University
  • Member of numerous choirs, barbershop quartets and other vocal endeavors over a nearly 50-year span
  • Thought leader in health care, healthy living and healthcare ethics, including mobile and information technologies
    • Wrote the ePatient Rap
    • Performed and recorded the ePatient Rap at HealthFoo
    • Special commendation as the first individual to request admission as a Fellow of the College (September 3rd, 2010), though he did so through a post on his own blog and failed to fill out an official application form until December 9th, 2013.  The College acknowledges this early demonstration of eminence and will accept this as evidence of his special contributions to the field should he ever apply to be named a Distinguished Fellow of ACMImimi (colloquially known as a Jolly Good Fellow of ACMImimi).  Note that The College currently has no application process for Distinguished Fellows, but is considering developing such a program to differentiate the deeply eminent from the merely eminent in the art and science of Medical Informatimusicology.

    T Forcht (Teo) Dagi, MD, DMedSc, MPH, MTS, MBA, FAANS, FACS, FCCM, FRCSEd, FACMImimi
    • Demonstrated proficiency in the study, practice and performance of operatic medical informatics in the Italian, French and British genres 
    • Conducted an investigation into whether Questa furtiva lagrima should be sung before or after EMR implementation
    • Investigated Largo al factotum on the availability of trauma surgeons in urban accident and emergency units
    • Conducted a study of the impact of Gelide mannine on outcomes in the ICU 
    • Maintains an interest in the pursuit of eminence-based medicine
    • Holds the record as the ACMImimi Fellow with the most declared credentials and designations
    Ricky Bloomfield, MD, FACMImimi
    • Combines his skills as a multi-instrumentalist (saxophone, clarinet, flute, and oboe) and singer to augment his work as the Director of Duke's Mobile Technology Strategy and developer of iOS apps
    • Showed the connection between musical and informatics creativity in a video from when he was Chief Resident in Pediatrics at UNC
    Donald G. Abbott, RN, BSN, CHt, FACMImimi
    • Writer and Producer of music videos at Genesis Medical Systems in Davenport, Iowa
    • Aspiring to become the world's leading medical beatboxer, submitting evidence for his mad skills as interpreted by Google Voice:  Boom, ba, bam, bam, boom, boom, ba, bam, bam, tss, tss, ba bam bam, bada BOOM
    New ACMImimi Members

    Yauheni V. Solad, MD

    Chen Lin

    Monday, October 14, 2013

    New Record Number of Inductees as Fellows of ACMImimi

    The Admissions Committee of The American College of Medical Informatimusicology is pleased to announce the Fall 2013 ACMImimi Fellow inductees. The record number seventeen new Fellows largely were introduced to ACMImimi at the Cerner Physician's Community Meeting on October 5th, 2013 in Kansas City, MO where Dr. Ross D. Martin, President and Founder of The College, presented and performed as the opening keynote speaker.  Congratulations to these new Fellows, deserving all.

    Those wishing to be considered for admission into The College as Fellows should submit an application to the Admissions Committee, which will review each application carefully and make a determination of worthiness based upon merit. The College now boasts 89 Fellows.  Who will be number 100?


    Rick Turner, MD, MBA, FACMImimi (October 6th, 2013)
    • Member of the world's largest ACMImimi Choir at the Cerner Physician's Community Meeting in Kansas City, MO on October 5th, 2013
    Julia L. Skapik, MD, MPH, FACMImimi (October 6th, 2013)
    • Member of the world's largest ACMImimi Choir at the Cerner Physician's Community Meeting in Kansas City, MO on October 5th, 2013
    Jeffrey Wall, MD, FACOG, FACMImimi (October 6th, 2013)
    • Member of the world's largest ACMImimi Choir at the Cerner Physician's Community Meeting in Kansas City, MO on October 5th, 2013
    • Self-taught in three different types of uillean pipes -- gaita, Gallegos, crone use du centre - representing Ireland, Spain and France, but NOT (emphatically, NOT!) those loud, noisy Scottish things that men in skirts like to parade around playing
    • Runs websites for the aforementioned pipes 
    Tom Fowler, FACMImimi (October 6th, 2013)
    • Member of the world's largest ACMImimi Choir at the Cerner Physician's Community Meeting in Kansas City, MO on October 5th, 2013
    • Sang karaoke at Go-Lives while working for Epic
    Brian Lancaster, FACMImimi (October 6th, 2013)
    • Member of the world's largest ACMImimi Choir at the Cerner Physician's Community Meeting in Kansas City, MO on October 5th, 2013
    Robert Duvoisin, DO, FACMImimi (October 6th, 2013)
    • Member of the world's largest ACMImimi Choir at the Cerner Physician's Community Meeting in Kansas City, MO on October 5th, 2013
    • Maker of Medical Informatimusicology videos, which he shares on YouTube and Vimeo
    Roy Ephraim Schutzengel, MD, MBA, FACMImimi (October 6th, 2013)
    • Member of the world's largest ACMImimi Choir at the Cerner Physician's Community Meeting in Kansas City, MO on October 5th, 2013
    • Was visibly moved by Dr. Martin's performance of "Reflection" at the Cerner Physician's Community Meeting
    Laurel Shelmandine, FACMImimi (October 6th, 2013)
    • Member of the world's largest ACMImimi Choir at the Cerner Physician's Community Meeting in Kansas City, MO on October 5th, 2013
    • Paid it forward by giving Dr. Martin a "blessing pin" for his wife after his performance at the Cerner Physician's Community Meeting
    Chase C. Pickering, PharmD, MBA, FACMImimi (October 6th, 2013)
    • Member of the world's largest ACMImimi Choir at the Cerner Physician's Community Meeting in Kansas City, MO on October 5th, 2013
    • CDS and CPOE designer and implementer who sees the individual notes of health care and works with them so they align and crescendo into a well-oiled machine
    • Plays his diatonic harmonica in the full chromatic scale as he accompanies health professionals during summer events
    • Donates all proceeds from his musical endeavors to health sciences
    Karen Ardis, MD, FAAFP, MA, FACMImimi (October 6th, 2013)
    • Member of the world's largest ACMImimi Choir at the Cerner Physician's Community Meeting in Kansas City, MO on October 5th, 2013
    • Bearer of children who have performed at Carnegie Hall and the Vienna Opera House
    • Has declared in her will that ABBA music be played at her funeral 
    Bimal R. Desai, MD, MBI, FAAP, FACMImimi (October 6th, 2013)
    • Winner of the ACMImimi "Most Well Documented Fellowship Applciation" Award 
    • 1993: Founding member of Emory University's male a capella ensemble "No Strings Attached".
    • 1995: Percussionist, backup vocals for Scottish folk/jazz band "Java Jive" at the University of St. Andrews.
    • 1996: Member of the St. Louis Symphony Chorus
    • 1998: Lead singer for Med School heavy metal cover band "Kuru" at Washington University
    • 1999: Member of the St. Louis Chamber Choir
    • 2002: Percussion and vocals for Pediatric Residency folk trio "Hand Foot & Mouth"
    • 2003: Member of U. Penn "Ancient Voices"
    • 2006: Member of the professional chamber choir "Voces Novae et Antiquae"
    • 2011: Founding member of "Chestnut Street Singers"
    • Multi-ethnic percussionist (Indian tabla, Latin snare cajon, west African djembe, middle eastern dunbek)
    • Taught himself the vocal technique known as "harmonic overtone singing", aka "throat singing", where the singer produces 2 pitches at the same time by amplifying certain harmonics. The Chestnut Street Singers included 2 pieces in recent programs that require the technique.  These 2 recordings demonstrates the technique:
    Lawrence R. Holzman, MBA, JD, FACMImimi (October 6th, 2013)
    • Serves as pro bono General Legal Council for The College
    • Uniquely qualified to serve as General Counsel based upon his credentials as:
      • A highly trained legal professional
      • A singer / songwriter and regularly performing musician
      • A stalwart participant in health care issues since birth (which he admits was a relatively passive role, but which transcended into a professional endeavor)
    • Focuses his research on the health effects of playing the B string on acoustic steel stringed guitars made by Taylor generally (presently working on the 100 series funding and expecting to research the other Taylor lines to continue through the 800 series in the future)
    • I also have a done a small bit or research testing the effects of properly dosed songs about marijuana as a placebo in place of actual marijuana.   A link to one of the the experiments on this project is attached below (entitled "Ganja Babe")
    • I conduct  my research with the able assistance of my colleagues at the "Dart Club" and at "The Dont Wannabees aka DWB" with the assistance of research labs the "Potomac Grill", "El Nopalito", Clydes-Chevy Chase, "Branded 72", "Outta the Way Cafe", "Dickies BBQ Germantown; "The Shanty" in Ellicott City; "Bennigins" in Clarksville and other comparable research facilities.
    • Member of the world's largest ACMImimi Choir at the Cerner Physician's Community Meeting in Kansas City, MO on October 5th, 2013
      John V. Phalen, FACMImimi (October 6th, 2013)
      • CEO and Founder of Zweena and zweenahealth.com
      • Member of Princeton Pro Musica for 23 years (and counting), ex board chair (x2)
      • Avid choral singer
      Craig H. Lipset, FACMImimi (October 6th, 2013)
      • Applying his BA in music from Brandeis University by working at Pfizer on applying HIT and other digital platforms to the challenges of clinical development
      • Implementing many of Dr. Martin's wild and crazy informatics ideas with musical style
      Doug Dickey, MD, FACMImimi (October 6th, 2013)
      • Member of the world's largest ACMImimi Choir at the Cerner Physician's Community Meeting in Kansas City, MO on October 5th, 2013
      • CMO for Physician Strategy at Cerner sponsoring and generally cheerleeding Dr. Martin presenting at the #CPC2013 conference
      • Big-time singer
      Michael Ash, MD, RPh, FACMImimi (October 6th, 2013)
      • Member of the world's largest ACMImimi Choir at the Cerner Physician's Community Meeting in Kansas City, MO on October 5th, 2013
      • VP, CMO at Cerner sponsoring the selection of Dr. Martin presenting at the #CPC2013 conference
      • Actively tweeting and spreading the ACMImimi message
      • Contributor to the arts by spreading the word
      Wendy Bongers, MD, FACMImimi (October 6th, 2013)
      • Member of the world's largest ACMImimi Choir at the Cerner Physician's Community Meeting in Kansas City, MO on October 5th, 2013

      Tuesday, July 2, 2013

      Arts Advocacy for Patients by Vera Rulon MS, RHIT, FAHIMA, FACMImimi

      One of my favorite topics is the convergence of art, science and healthcare. I was inspired to draw this picture as I thought about three people who advocate for patients through the arts.
      What do Regina Holliday, Dave deBronkart, and Dr. Ross Martin have in common? They each know that access to our personal health information is paramount to empower all of us to improve our personal health care. And they each express this through the arts.
      Who doesn’t know Dave deBronkart, AKA ePatient Dave? Dave told his story of finding a treatment that saved his life by researching it himself at a TedX talk. He led the audience in chanting “Let Patients Help”.  Dave stated that “you are the most underused resource in healthcare.” It was his personal experience that helped him understand the importance of empowering the patient. Access to information allows us, ePatients, to be “Equipped, Engaged, Empowered, Enabled” (coined by Tom Ferguson, MD).
      Regina Holliday, another familiar name, was empowered to advocate on behalf of patients everywhere after her husband’s death. The story of her husband’s suffering due to a poorly managed personal health information system is heartbreaking. She decided to express herself through painting. Holliday painted a mural in Washington DC called 73 Cents in reference to how much she was charged per page for access to his medical records. Through her project the Walking Gallery of Healthcare, Holliday engages people to wear her art, and contribute their own art, in order to tell the healthcare story, to put a face on patients all over the world. Regina painted my jacket earlier this year titled “Completing the Masterpiece” about my mother’s last days. In the picture, that’s me wearing my Walking Gallery jacket.
      Which brings us to Dr. Ross Martin, who founded The American College of Medical Informatimusicology (ACMImimi). Ross delivers the healthcare message through music. You can hear The Meaningful Yoose Rap here on this site. You can also join in and become a member of the College. In collaboration with ePatient Dave and others, the College produced Gimme My DaM Data. DaM stands for ‘data about me’.
      Ross’s music takes the idea of leveraging the arts to improve healthcare in a unique and creative way. Regina’s paintings resonate through visualizing and personalizing individual experiences. ePatient Dave’s talks and writings urge us to take charge of our healthcare. Self expression helps get the message out.
      All three also leverage social media. That’s why, in the drawing, I have Regina’s Walking Gallery, Ross’s ACMImimi, and ePatient Dave on a laptop. The rest of it is my perspective… from where I sat when I drew the picture. You can see parts of my living room including books and the French doors leading into the room, among other things.

      Monday, June 17, 2013

      The Sequester Blues

      ACMImimi Fellow (and coincidentally head of the NIH) Dr. Francis Collins provides his musical message on the impact of sequestration on NIH-funded research and innovation.  Dr. Collins is quickly on his way to earning a "Distinguished Fellow" designation!


      Thursday, May 30, 2013

      ACMImimi Inducts Seven New Fellows

      FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
      Washington, DC
      30 May 2013

      The ACMImimi Admissions Committee announced today the names of eight new inductees as Fellows of The College.  Their names and areas of eminence are presented herein.  In addition, The College recognizes two new Members -- Gowri Shetty and J. Shore -- and wishes them well on their quest to find their own Medical Informatimusicological eminence through hyper-specialization in and contributions to the art and science of the field.


      Martha B. Adams, MD, MA, FACP, FACMImimi (May 30th, 2013)
      • Our first informatimusicologist who hyper-specializes in the hammered dulcimer, playing a custom-built ConcertMaster, 4-octave plus, by Jerry Read Smith from Black Mountain, NC, finished in 2008
      • Co-hosts with her husband an annual mountain weekend retreat for fellow performers and dulcimer enthusiasts, which will surely feature informatimusicology in future retreats

      Sharon Wentz, RN, FACMImimi (May 30th, 2013)
      • Promoted the use of Direct messaging for health information exchange with a "60 Beats per Minute" video, which included a smokin' cool soundtrack

      Gia Sison, MD, FACMImimi (May 30th, 2013)

      • Frequent blogger and Twitter maven on all things medical and musical
      • Chair of the ACMImimi Admissions Committee (on temporary sabbatical as she undergoes chemotherapy for breast cancer)
      • President and Founder of the first international chapter of ACMImimi in The Philippines

      PF Anderson, FACMImimi (May 30th, 2013)

      Diana Driscoll, OD, LEEP AP, FACMImimi (May 30th, 2013)

      • Incorporates music and humor when delivering info and research on numerous "invisible illnesses" to patients via videos on www.Prettyill.com
      • Shares her music in nursing homes -- bringing the music from the 40's that they love
      • Gets energized to do her late-night videos on her Prettyill website in musical ways (you know you do this too)
      • Created the definitive ACMImimi theme song application video (which drove us to revise our instructions for singing the theme song)

      Tim Senior, BA (Hons), BM, BCh, MRCGP, FRACGP, DTM&H, DCH, FACMImimi (May 30th, 2013)
      • Wrote for the British Journal of General Practice on "Can Music be used in Medical Education" (November 2012) 
      • Ran a workshop at the GPET Convention in 2009 on the theme "Can Music be Used in Medical Education"
      • Wrote an article in the BJGP called "The influence of the Tricorder," which has nothing to do with medical informatimusicology, but balances out the fact that he is a viola player

      Parvez Dara, MD, FACP, FACMImimi (May 30th, 2013)

      Monday, April 8, 2013

      Reflection - A New ACMImimi Video Project

      Note on this post: The American College of Medical Informatimusicology frequently uses satire and irony in its posts. This post by Dr. Ross D. Martin, our President and Founder, is an exception as we are embarking on the creation of a new video to honor the special relationship between people experiencing serious health issues and their caregivers. The usual shtick will return in future posts. Thank you for understanding.

      I have been somewhat distracted from Informatimusicology as personal circumstances have taken priority. Specifically, the love of my life, my wife Kym, was diagnosed with her third cancer in 30 years -- this time breast cancer. I have taken to blogging about our shared experience on my personal blog.

      I've also been writing music in response to this experience and now am making an appeal to all of you for your help in creating a special video. I've written a new song, "Reflection," that speaks about the cancer journey as seen through the eyes of a caregiver and lover of one experiencing cancer. You can listen to an acoustic demo of the song at ReverbNation or through the widget below. The lyrics are at the end of this post.


      The Reflection Video Project 

      I'm now working with some musician friends -- Bill "Bumblebee" Davis and Travis Erwin -- to create a more polished version of the song, which will be soundtrack for a new video featuring, well, I hope, you. If you have a loved one -- be they a spouse, uncle, mother, friend -- whose chronic illness, cancer journey or other healthcare challenge you'd like to celebrate, please send an email to Reflection@ACMImimi.org:
      • Attach a picture (higher resolution is better - JPEG preferred) 
      • Include a brief quote, message of hope or just an "atta-boy" note that's about twitter length (140-ish characters) and suitable for sharing 
      • Let us know the names of the folks in the picture (first names only if you want) and where you are from (state/country is sufficient if that's all you want to share). 
      • Tell us your story too if you're willing to share it. 
      You can also post your picture/message/story as a comment on this blog post. By sending the picture, names and message, you are giving me permission to use them in the video montage, post them here on ACMImimi.org, and otherwise use them to promote the song and video.

      Contributors to the video will, of course, automatically be eligible to become Fellows of The College (but you still have to fill out an application form). Please know that we at The College are grateful for all that you do for making healthcare work better and loving people with medical needs. We hope this project will inspire us all to be better caregivers and to see the beauty in our loved ones even as they face difficult health challenges. Thank you.

      Reflection 

      Autumn rustles out my window
      Winter's time is near
      Shorter days cast longer shadows
      On the path we walk from here
      It's a detour undesired
      Still it's ours to share
      With a passion so inspired
      I'll go with you anywhere

      Just let me be your mirror
      So you can see
      Even as you're changing
      You are beautiful to me
      Let me be your mirror
      Let me be the one
      Let my eyes reflect your beauty
      As the moon reflects the sun

      It's easy to be frightened
      When the weather rolls in
      The senses are heightened
      And faith wears thin
      All the slings and arrows
      Start to take their toll
      If we focus on the narrow
      We miss out on the whole

      So let me be your mirror
      So you can see
      Even as you're changing
      You are beautiful to me
      Let me be your mirror
      Let me be the one
      Let my eyes reflect your beauty
      As the moon reflects the sun

      I can't promise you a miracle
      Still I'll pray one comes our way
      I'll be right here through it all
      And I'll love you every day
      In every way
      So hear me say

      Please let me be your mirror
      So you can see
      Even as you're changing
      You are beautiful to me
      Let me be your mirror
      Let me be the one
      Let my eyes reflect your beauty
      As the moon reflects the sun

      (c)2013 Ross D. Martin

      Monday, December 3, 2012

      Using Medical Music


      Although not directly related to Health Information Music, I hope this will inspire physicians to think about how they can use music to share information.

      One of the first things fetuses pay attention to in the outside world is music; studies have shown children who study a musical instrument do better at math. Public places use music to create safe zones, buying frenzies and cultural appeals for specific clientele. Yet our western culture tends to think listening to music as an adult is frivolous. In this article, I’m going to look at how medicine can use and is using music.

      Training Doctors 

      Medical trainees have vast amounts of anatomy, physiology and pharmacology to memorize. Some of those students would benefit from using music in that process. Some examples are Songs of Anatomy and Physiology, and Medical Terminology Concerto.

      Illustrating procedures can be made more memorable by using videos such as Colon is a Mighty Big River and da Vinci Robotic Hysterectomy.

      There are also great videos to kick start a lecture such as Breathe, Bad Project, Diagnosis Wenckebach, Children's Bill of Rights and Responsibilities and Eternal Clerking.

      Teaching students to be medical advocates can be aided by great examples like Unbreakable and Don't Smoke Ya Life Away.

      To help them relieve stress, try Med Life Stress, lose yourself and Waiting for the Beep.

      Finally creating music can take learning to a deeper level, relieve stress and/or add to the resources available to others. Why not start something musical at your school.
        
       

      Practising Medicine 

      Imagine having a screen or iPad available in the waiting room where patients could watch videos like Immunize: The Vaccine Anthem!, The Ulcer Rap or the more risky Manhood in the Mirror.

      For more ideas, see my website or follow my new Scoop.it.
      Deirdre Bonnycastle
      Fellow
      The American College of Medical Informatimusicology

      Saturday, December 1, 2012

      The Smokey Gray Carcinogen Blues

      From the ACMImimi Archives...



      This rare footage of "The Smokey Gray Carcinogen Blues" was discovered by ACMImimi archivists.  The song was written and performed by ACMImimi's President and Founder, Ross D. Martin, MD, MHA, FACMImimi back in December 1998 in his hometown of Fairborn, Ohio at the Fairborn Actor's Theatre as part of a double billed event including a concert by Dr. Martin and a performance of his 1996 original musical, A Carol's Christmas.

      The Smokey Gray Carcinogen Blues 

      I know you can't tell I'm a superhero just from the sound of my voice, but it's true — I'm Babyman — fighting for truth, justice, and the eradication of diaper rash from the planet! Of course, I haven't always been a superhero. Like most superheroes before me, my transformation involved a freak accident. I make my living as an obstetrician, and one day during a delivery, I was bitten by a radioactive baby. Over time, I became Babyman! And, like most superheroes, I have acquired amazing superpowers. I can projectile vomit thirty feet in any direction. When backed into a corner, I can emit an ear-piercing scream that not only deafens my would-be assailant, but also summons any mother within a three-mile radius to come running to my aid. But the most important superpower I possess is the ability to understand babytalk. You see, most people assume that babies cry when they're born because they're cold or hungry. Not true. They've been cooped up for nine months listening to everyone else talk without being able to get a word in edgewise and they are ticked! Most of them, of course, are upset about the fiscal cliff. And they were totally fed up with all the election ads, which sounded very scary in utero. deficit. But a while back, a baby came out and said, "Look, pal, could you do something about the cigarettes already? I was dying in there!" In consideration of his plea, I offer this song about smoking in pregnancy — from the baby's perspective...

      Well, I started out life a' thinkin' I was cool
      Just floatin' around in my private swimmin' pool
      Not a care in the world, though sometimes I'd get bored
      So I'd pass the time playing jump rope with my cord
      Then one day I woke up with a ringing in my ears
      My head was a' spinning — I cried amniotic tears
      I couldn't throw up a window in my womb without a view
      So I kicked my Ma to say I needed more O2.
      I said, "Yo, Ma! What gives? How bad's it gonna get?"
      That's when I knew she was puffin' on a stinkin' cigarette!
      My Mama's smokin' cigarettes — oh, what can I do?
      I've got the smoky gray carcinogen blues.

      Now I start off each morning feelin' weak and turnin' green
      'Cause my mom feeds me breakfast made with tar and nicotine
      My body's always hungry, looking for some descent eats
      I'm just wastin' away from my head down to my feets
      I keep strugglin' along 'cause I got nowhere else to go
      But I can tell by my size I'm gettin' insufficient flow
      My Mama's hooked on cigarettes — oh, what can I do?
      I've got the smoky gray carcinogen blues

      Oh, Doctor, can't you help me? Aren't you an M.D.?
      Living in this smoke-filled womb is not my cup of tea
      But you keep leading Mom on, saying everything is fine
      Hey, Doctor, can't you read the "No Smoking" sign?

      My placenta's so old, it's gonna have a heart attack
      So I'm checkin' out early from this dirty one-room shack
      My Mama's smokin' cigarettes — oh, what can I do?
      I've got the smoky gray carcinogen blues

      I said, my Mom won't kick the habit — oh, what can I do?
      I've got the dingy brown got-me-down...
      Stinkin' black heart attack...
      The grimy green nicotine blues.

      (c)1995 Ross D. Martin, MD, MHA, FACMImimi
      The American College of Medical Informatimusicology